Our Design and Technology Learning Area at The Leigh Academy offers an innovative and unique approach to understanding design in Britain as well as opening minds to the wider world.  We pride ourselves on the technical manufacturing knowledge our students gain and have a passion for inspiring the younger generation to engage successfully within education.

KS3: DT and the MYP

Intent

Design and Technology is an inspiring practical subject that challenges our students to use their imagination and knowledge to design and make products that solve real world problems, both as individuals and as part of a team. We aim to equip our students with the skills to empower impact and change through design. We motivate them to think about industrial developments, technological advancement, environmental and economical factors and the social and cultural importance of design in the rapidly changing world around them. We inspire students to read for pleasure through further inquiry led by the current topic. By following the IB Middle Years Programme (MYP) framework at KS3 we aim to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who are motivated to succeed; we strive to develop students who will build a better world through intercultural understanding and respect.

Our curriculum follows a pyramid structure. At KS3 students will cover the full spectrum of disciplines including Design & Technology, Engineering and Food Preparation & Nutrition. Students are exposed to industry standard equipment alongside specialist teaching to develop the knowledge and skills needed for a potential career with the sector. In years seven to nine students will complete three units per year. Each unit is focused on developing skills in one specialist area along with covering all four stands of the MYP assessment criteria

DoL – Mrs R Coules
raina.coules@leighacademy.org.uk

We offer our Year 7 cohort a wide range of design and manufacturing experiences that involve problem solving, design challenges, creative idea generation and independent working techniques.  Students work from a set brief and investigate the needs of a client or problem. From this point they develop solutions to real world scenarios using iterative design development in the cycle of the design.  As such, students sample what it is actually like to work in the Design, Engineering or Food sectors.

For Year 7 we offer a transition into secondary education that brings together the core learning from Key Stage 2 education and design creativity.  We offer an exciting, engaging curriculum which fosters independent learning and develops enthusiastic problem solvers, culminating in the learners becoming critical thinkers who can adapt to different situations.

Schedule of Learning Y7

During year seven all students will complete three units of study. We have designed each unit of study around the subject specialisms offered at KS4 and are as follows:

  • Habitats linked to Ks4 Engineering
  • Creative Play linked to Ks4 Design & Technology
  • And Food Choices linked to Ks4 Food Preparation & Nutrition.

These are delivered on rotation meaning not all year seven students will be studying the same unit at the same time. The way that we ensure that all student are progressing at the same uniform pace is to assess the four criterion points across all units as follows:

  • Module 1: Criteria A
  • Module 2: Criteria C
  • Module 3: Criteria B
  • Module 4: Criteria D
  • Module 5: Criteria A & B
  • Module 6: Criteria C & D

Year 7 Resources

Please refer to your child’s individual Google Classroom for lesson specific resources. 

DoL – Mrs R Coules
raina.coules@leighacademy.org.uk

Our Design and Technology Learning Area at The Leigh Academy offers an innovative and unique approach to understanding design in Britain as well as opening minds to the wider world.  We pride ourselves on the technical manufacturing knowledge our students gain and have a passion for inspiring the younger generation to engage successfully within education.

We offer our Year 8 cohort a wide range of design and manufacturing experiences that involve problem solving, design challenges, creative idea generation and independent working techniques.  Students get to work from a set brief and investigate the needs of a client or problem. From this point they develop solutions to real world scenarios using iterative design development in the cycle of the design.  As such, students sample what it is actually like to work in the Design, Engineering or Food sectors.

Schedule of Learning Y8

During year eight all students will complete three units of study. We have designed each unit of study around the subject specialisms offered at KS4 and are as follows:

  • Gravity Racers linked to Ks4 Engineering,
  • Child Development linked to Ks4 Design & technology,
  • And Food for others linked to Ks4 Food Preparation and Nutrition. 

These are delivered on rotation meaning not all year eight students will be studying the same unit at the same time.

The way that we ensure that all students are progressing at the same pace is to assess the four criterion points as follows:

  • Module 1: Criteria A
  • Module 2: Criteria C
  • Module 3: Criteria B
  • Module 4: Criteria D
  • Module 5: Criteria A & B
  • Module 6: Criteria C & D

Year 8 Resources

Please refer to your child’s individual Google Classroom for lesson specific resources. Home learning will be set by each teacher according to the needs of the student and topics covered in class.  This can in many forms and is dependent on what has been covered in class, such as paper based in the sketch book or online on the google classroom.  In addition, students should be supporting their learning by using the knowledge organisers to enhance their understanding.

DoL – Mrs R Coules
raina.coules@leighacademy.org.uk

Schedule of Learning Y9

For students in year nine we adopt a linear approach to the Design curriculum. Students are taught in classes of twenty which creates a fantastic opportunity for extension of knowledge and skills alongside preparation for key stage four in the learning area. The focus of year nine is for students to build upon their learning from year seven and eight and begin to develop the confidence to adapt and personalise their practical outcomes. 

In module one and two students study a unit based on Cultural food linked to Ks4 Food Preparation and Nutrition. During module three and four students will complete an exploratory unit focus on light linked to Ks4 Design and Technology. Finally in module five and six students will inquire into the ergonomic needs of others whilst developing a mechanical aid. This unit is linked to Ks4 Engineering.

Year 9 Resources

Google Classroom

Please refer to your child’s individual Google Classroom for lesson specific resources. 

Knowledge Organisers

These are for use across the MYP year and should be referred to throughout for guidance on methods in approach and technical information that could be useful in each project.

Homework

Home learning will be set by each teacher according to the needs of the student and topics covered in class.  This can in many forms and is dependent on what has been covered in class, such as paper based in the sketch book or online on the google classroom.  In addition, students should be supporting their learning by using the knowledge organisers to enhance their understanding.

Assessment (year 7 and 8)

Students will be assessed on the following skills and knowledge across year seven and year eight.

  • Criteria A: Inquiring and Analysing. This involves gathering research to inform an ongoing project, the learner may investigate how a problem could be solved or how they could meet the brief requirements.  Successful research in strand A will be represented as what the learner has discovered and how they might use the information to inform their ideas.
  • Criteria B: Developing Design Ideas. The students will be assessed on the range of design ideas developed within the project and how well the designs link to research gathered for strains A.  Design work should be communicated clearly, this can be achieved through drawing style, labelling and describing the ideas (annotation). Learners will also produce a specification that can clearly inform the manufacturing of the solution.
  • Criteria C: Creating the solution. Students will be assessed on their ability to create a plan of manufacture or follow the plan for manufacture and create a working solution.  This can be developed from the student and or teacher implemented but the learner will need to demonstrate technical ability when making the solution and this will be evident through the end product produced. Finally learners should demonstrate an ability to reflect on what has been successful and what could be improved, this is evidenced through sketchbook manufacturing notes and discussion.
  • Criteria D: Evaluating. Evaluation is important for students to engage in throughout their project as well as at the finale.  This involves the learner being reflective and constructive in their approach to analysing. It can be completed by self evaluating, peer feedback and tests to see if the development of the idea and the solution can work as intended. 

Assessment (year 9)

Students will be assessed on the following skills and knowledge across year nine,

  • Criteria A: Inquiring and Analysing. This involves gathering research to inform an ongoing project, the learner may investigate how a problem could be solved or how they could meet the brief requirements.  Successful research in strand A will be represented as what the learner has discovered and how they might use the information to inform their ideas.
  • Criteria B: Developing Design Ideas. The students will be assessed on the range of design ideas developed within the project and how well the designs link to research gathered for strains A.  Design work should be communicated clearly, this can be achieved through drawing style, labelling and describing the ideas (annotation). Learners will also produce a specification that can clearly inform the manufacturing of the solution.
  • Criteria C: Creating the solution. Students will be assessed on their ability to create a plan of manufacture or follow the plan for manufacture and create a working solution.  This can be developed from the student and or teacher implemented but the learner will need to demonstrate technical ability when making the solution and this will be evident through the end product produced. Finally learners should demonstrate an ability to reflect on what has been successful and what could be improved, this is evidenced through sketchbook manufacturing notes and discussion.
  • Criteria D: Evaluating. Evaluation is important for students to engage in throughout their project as well as at the finale.  This involves the learner being reflective and constructive in their approach to analysing. It can be completed by self evaluating, peer feedback and tests to see if the development of the idea and the solution can work as intended.

KS4: GCSE Design and Technology

DoL – Mrs R Coules
raina.coules@leighacademy.org.uk

Students will follow a curriculum of theory and project based learning, that is completely interleaved in a ‘ discover and do’ format and will cover all aspects of the OCR GCSE specification in year one. 

Schedule of Learning Y10

  • Module 1: Baby Toy Project: Design Communication methods, Technical drawing skills, Modelling Techniques, Timbers and Manufactured Boards, Paper and Boards, Designing for Humans, Planning for Manufacture. End of Module Test.
  • Module 2: Baby Toy Project: Packaging, Printing Methods, Polymers, CAD CAM, Practical Manufacture – Timbers and Polymers. End of Module Test
  • Module 3: Solar Light Project: Energy Sources/Alternative Energy, Environmental Considerations in Material selection and Product Manufacture, Metals, Electronics – Inputs/Outputs/Processes, Practical Soldering and Metal Manufacture.  End of Module Test
  • Module 4: Practise GCSE Project: Useability, Social Moral and Cultural Considerations, Forces and Motion, 2D Design, Laser Cutting, Exploring a context and recording real time evidence, Designing. End of Module Test
  • Module 5: Practise GCSE Project cont: Making and Evaluating. Mechanical Devices, Structural Integrity, Testing Methods, QA, QC, Health and Safety, Risk Assessments, Scales of Manufacture, Emerging Technologies. End of Module Test
  • Module 6: Begin Actual GCSE NEA – Context Analysis, Brief Writing, Research Plan. Theory: Textiles, Modern and Smart Materials,  Maths in DT. Mock Exam

Students will have one theory lesson and two project lessons per week. They will be given one theory and one project homework per week.

Students’ will have a sound knowledge of the influences, methods and practical experience of how product designers solve real world problems.

Year 10 Resources

DoL – Mrs R Coules
raina.coules@leighacademy.org.uk

Students will reaffirm and improve on previous theory knowledge as they revisit exam topics and focus on exam strategy.  Through the completion of their NEA, students will compound their knowledge of product design and manufacture.

Schedule of Learning Y11

  • Module 1: Theory: Marketing Influences, Designing for Humans, Environmental Considerations/Alternative Energy LCA and 6R’s, Social, Moral and Cultural Considerations, Papers and Boards and Timbers and Manufactured Boards. NEA: Finalise Research – Strand One Assessment.  Begin Design Development – Strand Two and Three Assessment.
  • Module 2: Theory: Polymers/Biopolymers, Metals, Textiles, Smart and Modern Materials, Scales of Manufacture, Health and Safety, QA, QC, Risk Assessments.  NEA: Design Development, Modelling, Sampling, Testing, Completion of final Design and Plan for Manufacture – Strand Two and Three Assessment..
  • Module 3: Theory All Material Areas Manufacture, Emerging Technologies. NEA: Practical Manufacture – Strand Four Assessment.
  • Module 4: Theory: Forces and Mechanisms, Design Communication and Technical Drawing, Area/Volume/Scale/Ratio/Percentages/Profit and Loss/Trigonometry.  NEA Finalise Practical Manufacture and Complete Evaluation – Strand Five Assessment.  Hand-in NEA
  • Module 5: Theory: Revision.  NEA: Improvements and Corrections – Final Hand-In.
  • Module 6: Exam

Students will have one theory lesson and two project lessons per week. They will be given one theory and one project homework per week. In theory lessons, Students will focus on answering a variety of exam questions and practise exam strategies.  Project lessons will focus on the NEA, where students will be introduced to the assessment strands and given examples of how to tackle and carry out their coursework independently.

Students will master and improve their exam performance.  They will demonstrate their understanding of product design and manufacture through independent application of their NEA.

Year 11 Resources

A piece of Photography captured by a Leigh Academy student of some Oranges on a vine.

KS4: BTEC Food and Nutrition

DoL – Mrs R Coules
raina.coules@leighacademy.org.uk

Students will learn how to demonstrate effective and safe cooking skills, preparing and cooking using a variety of food commodities, cooking techniques and equipment. They will develop knowledge and understanding of functional properties and chemical processes as well as the nutritional content of food and drinks. Students will understand the relationship between diet, nutrition and health, including the physiological and psychological effects of poor diet and health, understand the economic, environmental, ethical, and socio-cultural influences on food availability, production processes, and diet and health choices. Students will also demonstrate knowledge and understanding of functional and nutritional properties, sensory qualities and microbiological food safety considerations when preparing, processing, storing, cooking and serving food. They will understand and explore a range of ingredients and processes from different culinary traditions (traditional British and International), to inspire new ideas or modify existing recipes.

Students will plan, cook and present food, discovering food origins and various methods of food preparation, they will need to source and purchase ingredients for practical elements evaluating their finished dishes and applying their knowledge of flavours and techniques to improve. The subject content sets out the knowledge, understanding and skills common to all specifications in Cooking and Nutrition to ensure progression from Key Stage 3 national curriculum requirements to enable the possibility of development on to further study.

The students learn in a variety of ways; group learning, individually, class learning, they also get the chance to lead their own learning through investigative tasks. Students are encouraged to think outside the box and gain a new perceptive outlook.

Students continuously partake in research and investigation tasks to enforce their learning; where needed tasks are also set to enable students to pre-learn the content of the coming lessons or home learning tasks set to reinforce the learning of the lesson. When students begin their coursework they will work independently to produce a personalised project, which is worked on both in lessons and at home.

Food Preparation and Cooking course equips students with the knowledge, understanding, and skills required to cook and apply the principles of food science, nutrition and healthy eating. It encourages students to cook and enables them to make informed decisions about a wide range of further learning opportunities and career pathways as well as develop vital life skills that enable them to feed themselves and others affordably and nutritiously, now and later in life. Students are able to apply to local colleges or train within establishments for roles such as trainee chefs, hotel management, events management, restaurant and bar management and catering supervisors and many more food related careers.

Schedule of Learning

Students complete internal exams in  year 10 and begin their coursework (50% of their final grade) in year 10 which they finish in year 11 in time for the exam (50% of their final grade).

  • Module 1: Food Spoilage + Food Provenance/ Waste & Dept of practical skills
  • Module 2: Principles of nutrition & food commodities
  • Module 3: The science of cooking food (inc NEA 1 practice)
  • Module 4: Diet and Good health
  • Module 5: Factors affecting food choice
  • Module 6: Skills and presentation (inc NEA 2 practice)

Additional information

Students will learn how to demonstrate effective and safe cooking skills, preparing and cooking using a variety of food commodities, cooking techniques and equipment. They will develop knowledge and understanding of functional properties and chemical processes as well as the nutritional content of food and drinks. Students will understand the relationship between diet, nutrition and health, including the physiological and psychological effects of poor diet and health, understand the economic, environmental, ethical, and socio-cultural influences on food availability, production processes, and diet and health choices. Students will also demonstrate knowledge and understanding of functional and nutritional properties, sensory qualities and microbiological food safety considerations when preparing, processing, storing, cooking and serving food. They will understand and explore a range of ingredients and processes from different culinary traditions (traditional British and International), to inspire new ideas or modify existing recipes.

Students will plan, cook and present food, discovering food origins and various methods of food preparation, they will need to source and purchase ingredients for practical elements evaluating their finished dishes and applying their knowledge of flavours and techniques to improve. The subject content sets out the knowledge, understanding and skills common to all specifications in Cooking and Nutrition to ensure progression from Key Stage 3 national curriculum requirements to enable the possibility of development on to further study.

The students learn in a variety of ways; group learning, individually, class learning, they also get the chance to lead their own learning through investigative tasks. Students are encouraged to think outside the box and gain a new perceptive outlook.

Students continuously partake in research and investigation tasks to enforce their learning; where needed tasks are also set to enable students to pre-learn the content of the coming lessons or home learning tasks set to reinforce the learning of the lesson. When students begin their coursework they will work independently to produce a personalised project, which is worked on both in lessons and at home.

Food Preparation and Cooking course equips students with the knowledge, understanding, and skills required to cook and apply the principles of food science, nutrition and healthy eating. It encourages students to cook and enables them to make informed decisions about a wide range of further learning opportunities and career pathways as well as develop vital life skills that enable them to feed themselves and others affordably and nutritiously, now and later in life. Students are able to apply to local colleges or train within establishments for roles such as trainee chefs, hotel management, events management, restaurant and bar management and catering supervisors and many more food related careers.

Schedule of Learning

  • Module 1: NEA 1 Coursework
  • Module 2: NEA 2 Practice skills and dishes
  • Module 3: NEA 2 Development of final dishes 
  • Module 4: NEA 2 Practical exam and evaluation
  • Module 5: Revision for theory exam
  • Module 6: Revision for theory exam practical exam

Additional information

Using realistic vocational contexts, students will acquire sector-specific applied knowledge and skills, studying mechanical, electrical/electronic and engineering design and how these sectors interrelate in industry. Students will develop a range of skills which are attractive to employers, colleges and universities including; communication, critical thinking, learning independently, research, taking on responsibility and time management.

A piece of Photography captured by a Leigh Academy student of some Oranges on a vine.

KS4: BTEC Engineering

DoL – Mrs R Coules
raina.coules@leighacademy.org.uk

We cannot predict the future but one thing remains a certainty, engineers will play a huge role in shaping the world around us.  Engineering is offered as a vocational subject to Key Stage 4. With the application of science, engineering and numeracy students can link practical and problem solving skills with the Engineered world.

Students will learn through practical tasks and application of knowledge.  Students will be required to demonstrate their understanding by carrying out practical tasks in the workshop.  Learning will be supported by visits to local Engineering establishments where possible and industry experts in lessons. Students will learn how to identify, comprehend, analyse and evaluate through the written submissions required for each component.

Using realistic vocational contexts, students will acquire sector-specific applied knowledge and skills, studying mechanical, electrical/electronic and engineering design and how these sectors interrelate in industry. Students will develop a range of skills which are attractive to employers, colleges and universities including; communication, critical thinking, learning independently, research, taking on responsibility and time management.

Schedule of Learning

During year ten students will follow the schedule of learning outlined below.

  • Module 1: Introduction to Engineering, Manufacturing Techniques & Understanding Engineering Drawings 
  • Module 2: Presentation Engineering information, Planning methods and computer aided design.
  • Module 3: Mock examination based on the knowledge required for unit three and exploring testing methods.
  • Module 4: Practise of unit two assessment, Mechanical design and Electronic design.
  • Module 5: Understanding the Engineering design cycle.
  • Module 6: Unit one Manufacturing engineering products internally assessed coursework unit.

Additional information

The course focuses on manufacturing and multiple-production techniques.  Students design and make products incorporating mechanisms, electronics, CAD and structural principles, using materials and components for strength and fitness-for-purpose. The majority of projects are linked to real world learning and National competitions. Students will gain an appreciation for the accuracy required to produce precision components within Engineering. They will also develop their ability to work independently as well as being an integral member of a team.

Students will learn through practical tasks and application of knowledge. Students will be required to demonstrate their understanding when carrying out practical tasks in the workshop. Learning will be supported by visits to local Engineering establishments and industry experts in lessons. Students will need to be highly motivated to ensure that they keep up to date with coursework and meet unit deadlines throughout the duration of the course. Enthusiastic students will take the time to further research principles learnt in class to enhance their learning.

Using realistic vocational contexts, students will acquire sector-specific applied knowledge and skills, studying mechanical, electrical/electronic and engineering design and how these sectors interrelate in industry. Students will develop a range of skills which are attractive to employers, colleges and universities including; communication, critical thinking, learning independently, research, taking on responsibility and time management.

Schedule of Learning

  • Module 1: Component three exam preparation focusing engineering manufacturing process and materials. Students will explore a given brief and reflect on how a product could be improved to meet the needs of the client. Students will build upon their prior knowledge and exam technique.
  • Module 2: Final preparations for component three examinations and sit external exams.
  • Module 3: Exam reflection and analysis 
  • Module 4: Exam preparations 
  • Module 5: Possible resits of external component three exams.

Additional information

KS5: A Level Product Design

DoL – Mrs R Coules
raina.coules@leighacademy.org.uk

Product Design is a creative and stimulating subject that encourages students to develop a broad view of design and technology. It enables the ability to design and make products whilst appreciating the complex relationships between design, materials, manufacture, the history of design and the evolution of technology. Students will need to be creative, inquisitive risk-takers, who are able to work independently to achieve best results. They will work closely alongside clients to meet self-generated or given briefs and will develop their communication, analytical and problem solving skills.

Year One of the Product Design A Level course is primarily concerned with practical ‘Upskilling’ and covering the theory part of the specification. For two lessons per week, students will focus on developing specific skills such as Drawing and Designing, Modelling, Manufacturing and Problem solving. This will be combined with one lesson of theory and one lesson of developing their CAD skills.

By the end of year one students will be able to determine, classify and analyse a comprehensive range of materials and components; understand and analyse the necessity of designing for our surroundings, considering the environment and inclusiveness; consumer safety and technological developments and be familiar and confident with an array of manufacturing processes and fabrication methods at different scales of production. 

Schedule of Learning Y12

  • Module 1: Theory – Scales of Production, Manufacturing Processes for all Materials and Finishes.Project – Designing and Communicating. CAD – Solidworks
  • Module 2: Theory – Quality Control, Health and Safety and Legislation. Maths in Technology.  Project – Modelling techniques.  CAD Solidworks
  • Module 3:  Theory – Materials, Properties and Applications, Structural Integrity, Environmental concerns, LCA.  Project – Manufacturing processes.  CAD Solidworks
  • Module 4: Theory – Marketing Influences, Product Cycles, Designing for Humans, Design influences, Distribution, Intellectual Property.  Project – Problem Solving. CAD – Solidworks.
  • Module 5:  Theory Materials and Manufacturing Revision.  Begin NEA – Exploring Contexts.  CAD – Solidworks.
  • Module 6: Theory Revision for Mock Exams. Continue with NEA, Brief Writing and Research.

There will be a short test at the end of each module and a Mock exam in module six.

Additional Information

DoL – Mrs R Coules
raina.coules@leighacademy.org.uk

Product Design is a creative and stimulating subject that encourages students to develop a broad view of design and technology. It enables the ability to design and make products whilst appreciating the complex relationships between design, materials, manufacture, the history of design and the evolution of technology. Students will need to be creative, inquisitive risk-takers, who are able to work independently to achieve best results. They will work closely alongside clients to meet self-generated or given briefs and will develop their communication, analytical and problem solving skills.

In year two, students will revisit theory topics and practise exam strategy.  A large amount of time will be spent on the NEA, which is a real-time extended design and manufacture project.

Students will begin to master exam responses and build on their experience of solving real life problems through design and manufacture.

Schedule of Learning Y13

  • Module 1: Theory – Revision.  NEA – Continue extended project/ Design Development.
  • Module 2: Theory – Revision.  NEA – Continue extended project/ Design Development.
  • Module 3: Theory – Revision.  NEA – Continue extended project/ Manufacturing
  • Module 4: Theory – Revision.  NEA – Continue extended project/ Evaluation
  • Module 5: Exam Papers 1 & 2.  NEA Hand-in.

Additional Information

KS5: BTEC Engineering

DoL – Mrs R Coules
raina.coules@leighacademy.org.uk

Intent

The Engineering BTEC National qualification provides a broad introduction that gives learners transferable knowledge and skills designed around industry needs. This qualification is for post-16 learners who want to continue their education through applied learning. The qualifications prepare learners, with experience of research, extended writing and meeting deadlines. Learners will utilise numeracy and scientific knowledge to solve problems and support their design work, coupled with analytical skills, interpreting a given brief, scoping initial design ideas, preparing a design proposal and evaluation. Learners will have confidence in presenting ideas, working as a team and use industry packages such as solidworks to support their delivery.

Schedule of Learning

Through year twelve and year thirteen students will complete four individual units of study as outlined below. These units are delivered alongside each other throughout the course.

Internal

  • Unit 1: Engineering Principles, Written Exam Externally – Assessed
  • Unit 2: Delivery of Engineering Processes Safely as a Team – Internally Assessed

External

  • Unit 3: Engineering Product Design and Manufacture – Externally Assessed 8 Hour Controlled Assessment.
  • Unit 10: Computer Aided Design for Engineers

Throughout modules one to six students will study unit one, Engineering Principles, each week with specialist maths and physics teachers.

Students will also begin their unit two internal coursework unit alongside preparing for the unit three external examination. Unit two internal coursework will be submitted in module six of year twelve.

Implementation

Students will study four units to provide them with the practical skills and theoretical principles that are essential for a successful future career in the Engineering sector. 

All units are set around a vocational context and are delivered through hands-on practical application. Students will have access to a fully equipped workshop with up-to-date technologies and advice from specialist technicians.

Students are required to provide clear and accurate evidence of their learning for all units and are encouraged to use their own learning styles to produce this evidence using a range of media.

Impact

This course provides transferable knowledge and skills that prepares learners for progression to university. The transferable skills that universities value include: 

  • The ability to learn independently 
  • The ability to research actively and methodically 
  • Being able to give presentations and being active group members. 
  • Cognitive and problem-solving skills: use critical thinking, approach non-routine problems applying expert and creative solutions, use systems and technology 
  • Intrapersonal skills: communicating, working collaboratively, negotiating and influencing, self-presentation 
  • Personal skills: self-management, adaptability and resilience, self-monitoring and development.

Year 12 Resources

DoL – Mrs R Coules
raina.coules@leighacademy.org.uk

Intent

The Engineering BTEC National qualification provides a broad introduction that gives learners transferable knowledge and skills designed around industry needs. This qualification is for post-16 learners who want to continue their education through applied learning. The qualifications prepare learners, with experience of research, extended writing and meeting deadlines. Learners will utilise numeracy and scientific knowledge to solve problems and support their design work, coupled with analytical skills, interpreting a given brief, scoping initial design ideas, preparing a design proposal and evaluation. Learners will have confidence in presenting ideas, working as a team and use industry packages such as solidworks to support their delivery.

Schedule of Learning

Through year twelve and year thirteen students will complete four individual units of study as outlined below. These units are delivered alongside each other throughout the course.

Internal

  • Unit 1: Engineering Principles, Written Exam Externally – Assessed
  • Unit 2: Delivery of Engineering Processes Safely as a Team – Internally Assessed

External

  • Unit 3: Engineering Product Design and Manufacture, Externally Assessed 8 Hour Controlled Assessment.
  • Unit 10: Computer Aided Design for Engineers

In modules one and two students will begin their final preparations for unit one and unit three. External exams will be early module three. Students will have an opportunity to retake these exams in May if required. 

During module one students will begin their final unit of internal coursework, unit ten computer aided design. This coursework will be submitted in module five.

Implementation

Students will study four units to provide them with the practical skills and theoretical principles that are essential for a successful future career in the Engineering sector. 

All units are set around a vocational context and are delivered through hands-on practical application. Students will have access to a fully equipped workshop with up-to-date technologies and advice from specialist technicians.

Students are required to provide clear and accurate evidence of their learning for all units and are encouraged to use their own learning styles to produce this evidence using a range of media.

Impact

This course provides transferable knowledge and skills that prepares learners for progression to university. The transferable skills that universities value include: 

  • the ability to learn independently 
  • the ability to research actively and methodically 
  • being able to give presentations and being active group members. 
  • cognitive and problem-solving skills: use critical thinking, approach non-routine problems applying expert and creative solutions, use systems and technology 
  • intrapersonal skills: communicating, working collaboratively, negotiating and influencing, self-presentation 
  • personal skills: self-management, adaptability and resilience, self-monitoring and development.

Year 13 Resources