Post 16 Subject Information

Please view all the Options subject information for Post 16 students below.

BTEC Applied Science

Title of Course
Applied Science

Level
BTEC

Staff Contact
Craig Goddard | Director of Learning – Science

Course Outline

Designed for learners who are interested in learning about the sector alongside other fields of study, with a view to progressing to a wide range of higher education courses, not necessarily in applied science. Anyone considering a career in nursing should take this course, along with BTEC Health and Social Care.  The course comprises 3 core mandatory units and one option unit:

  •  Unit 1: Principles and Applications of Science
  •  Unit 2: Practical Scientific Procedures and Techniques
  •  Unit 3: Science Investigation Skills

The fourth unit, covering content from one of a range of optional units, is also taught and assessed.

Course Assessment

Externally assessed Units:

  • Unit 1: Assessed via 3x 40 minutes external written examinations – one examination per science. Each examination is out of 30 marks.
  • Unit 3: Assessed across two sections, Unit 3 involves the completion of a practical investigation (3 hours) followed by written exam questions (1.5 hours) relating to the procedure, analysis and evaluation of the investigation.

Internally assessed Units:

  • Unit 2 & The Option Unit: Students complete a portfolio of assignments, linking key practical procedures to their underlying scientific concepts.

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 5 in  Mathematics
  • Minimum grade 5-5+ in Combined Science  or minimum  Grade 5 in Separate Science
IB Biology

Title of Course
Biology

Level
IB

Staff Contact
Craig Goddard | Director of Learning – Science

Course Outline

Biology is the study of life. Biologists attempt to understand the living world at all levels using many different approaches and techniques. At one end of the scale is the cell, its molecular construction and complex metabolic reactions. At the other end of the scale biologists investigate the interactions that make whole ecosystems functions. 

An interest in life is natural for humans; not only are we living organisms ourselves, but we depend on many species for our survival, are threatened by some and co-exist with many more.

The Post-16 IB Biology course explores the following topic areas:

Core Level

  • Cell biology
  • Molecular biology
  • Genetics
  • Ecology
  • Evolution and biodiversity
  • Human physiology

Additional Higher Level (AHL)

  • Nucleic acids
  • Metabolism, cell respiration and photosynthesis
  • Plant biology
  • Genetics and evolution
  • Animal physiology

Course Assessment

External Assessment (80%)

  • Paper 1: Multiple Choice Questions
  • Paper 2: Written responses for SL & HL core
  • Paper 3: Written responses for option unit and practical skills

Internal Assessment (20%)

  • A written report on the findings of an experiment conducted by students.

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 6 in  Mathematics
  • Grade 6-6+ in Combined Science OR 6+ in Biology
BTEC Business

Title of Course
Business

Level
BTEC

Staff Contact
Adam Hart | Director of Learning – Business

Course Outline

BTEC Business is for learners interested in gaining an in depth understanding of the operations and structures of businesses.  The course will equip students with the skills needed to either start their working life or continue to study at university. During the course, students investigate businesses in the public, private and voluntary sectors. Students complete external assessment (exams) in year 12; creating a marketing campaign for unit 2, and responding to challenging financial questions in Unit 3. During year 13, students complete two teacher assessed units, giving students the opportunity to get creative in various assignment tasks that  outline business planning, operations and management theory (Unit 1), and finally planning and undertaking a recruitment simulation (Unit 8). Students on the BTEC course are expected to bring a sound team ethic to the classroom and an enthusiasm for enterprise.

Course Assessment

External Assessment

  • Unit 2 Developing a marketing campaign (3 hr Exam)
  • Unit 3 Personal and Business Finance (2 hr Exam)

Internal Assessment

  • Unit 1 Exploring Business (3 coursework assignments)
  • Unit 8 Recruitment and Selection (2 coursework assignments)

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade  4 in Mathematics
  • Grade 4 in English Language
IB Diploma Business Management

Title of Course
Business Management

Level
IB Diploma

Staff Contact
Adam Hart | Director of Learning – Business

Course Outline

Students on the IB Diploma in Business Management learn the key characteristics of business organisation and environment. We focus on the functions of human resources, finance, marketing and operations. The IB course allows students to develop a holistic understanding of today’s complex and dynamic business environment. Students learn to analyse, discuss and evaluate business activities at local, national and international level, exploring, through case study and student investigation, a range of organisations, as well as the socio-cultural and economic contexts in which they operate. Over two years, students develop relevant and transferable skills, including the ability to: think critically; make ethically sound and well-informed decisions; appreciate the pace, nature and significance of change; think strategically; and undertake long term planning, analysis and evaluation.

Course Assessment

External assessments (75%)

  • Paper 1: Units 1-5, written essays to pre-seen case study [2h15m]
  • Paper 2: Units 1-5, written responses to exam questions [2h15m] 

Internal assessment (25%)

  • 2000 word report on research that students undertake to answer a problem faced by a local business.

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade  4 in Mathematics
  • Grade 4 in English
IB Chemistry

Title of Course
Chemistry

Level
IB

Staff Contact
Craig Goddard | Director of Learning for Science

Course Outline

Chemistry is an experimental science that combines academic study with the acquisition of practical and investigational skills. It is often called the central science, as chemical principles underpin both the physical environment in which we live and all biological systems. Apart from being a subject worthy of study in its own right, chemistry is a prerequisite for many other courses in higher education, such as medicine, biological science and environmental science and serves as useful preparation for employment.

The Post-16 IB Chemistry course explores the following topic areas:

Core Level

  • Stoichiometric relationships
  • Atomic structure
  • Periodicity
  • Chemical bonding and structure
  • Energetics/thermochemistry
  • Chemical kinetics
  • Equilibrium
  • Acids and bases
  • Redox processes
  • Organic chemistry
  • Measurement and data processing

Additional Higher Level

  • Atomic structure
  • The periodic table
  • Chemical bonding and structure
  • Energetics/ thermochemistry
  • Chemical kinetics
  • Equilibrium
  • Acids and bases
  • Redox processes
  • Organic chemistry
  • Measurement and analysis

Course Assessment

Externally assessed Units (80%):

  • Paper 1: Multiple Choice Questions
  • Paper 2: Written responses for SL & HL core
  • Paper 3: Written responses for option unit and practical skills

Internally assessed Units (20%):

  • A written report on the findings of an experiment conducted by students.

 

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 5 in  Mathematics
  • Minimum grade 5-5+ in Combined Science  or minimum  Grade 5 in Separate Science
BTEC Computing

Title of Course
Computing

Level
BTEC

Staff Contact
Manjinder Hayre | Coordinator of Learning – ICT

Course Outline

Whilst studying for the external aspect (examinations) of this qualification students will explore a range of areas within Computing such as the logical and structured ways that computer systems process data to develop programs, processes and systems that solve specific problems. Students will examine the features of effective computer programming and apply accepted computing and programming paradigms whilst analysing, developing and evaluating algorithms and computer code, and propose and apply solutions to ensure that computer systems are fit for purpose. Candidates will develop the computational-thinking skills to effectively analyse a problem, break it down into its component parts, and design and evaluate solutions. Students will progress to explore the relationship between hardware and software as part of a computer system and examine the way computer components work both individually and together to store and process data, and the way in which data is transmitted and used in computer systems.

As part of their internal assessments, students will investigate the many different types of security attack, the vulnerabilities that exist and techniques that can be used to defend the IT systems of organisations. They will learn about the complexities of configuring and supporting networks within an organisation. Students must also explore how encryption can be used to protect data and plan and apply suitable protection to an IT system and test it to ensure the protection is effective. Candidates will learn to configure an IT system’s access control settings to control user access to various IT system resources, including files, folders and printers. As part of their final internal assessment, students will explore different social media websites and analyse the ways in which they can be used and the potential pitfalls when using them for organisational purposes. Students must then develop a plan to use social media strategies within an organisation to achieve its specific business aims and objectives.

Course Assessment

External Assessment:

  • Unit 1: Principles of Computer Science This unit is assessed through a written examination. The examination is two hours in length. During the supervised assessment period, learners will be assessed on their ability to apply their computational-thinking skills to solve problems. The number of marks for the unit is 90.
  • Unit 2: Fundamentals of Computer Systems This unit is assessed through a written examination set and marked by Pearson. The examination is one hour and 45 minutes in length. The number of marks for the unit is 80.

Internal Assessment

  • Unit 7: IT Systems Security & Encryption
  • Unit 8: Business Application of Social Media

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 4 in English Language and Mathematics and a Science related subject
  • Grade 5 in computing or Computer Science
BTEC Creative Digital Media Production

Title of Course
Creative Digital Media Production

Level
BTEC

Staff Contact
Adam Leadbeater | Coordinator of Learning – Media and Film

Course Outline

In BTEC Creative Media Production students learn how to research and analyse Media texts before applying them to their own ideas. Students are given the opportunity to explore the planning processes within the industry and create a practical production with post production techniques such as editing. This is a well rounded course for those who wish to break into the Media industry with experience of all the production processes they need.

Course Assessment

Internal Assessment

  • Unit 4 – Pre-production Portfolio – Creating a blog containing research and pre-production materials
  • Unit 10 – Film Production – A textual analysis with accompanying practical film project

External Assessment

  • Unit 1 – Media Representations – Textual analysis of several visual/audio and print texts  [2 hours]
  • Unit 8 – Responding to a Commission – Responding to a previously seen brief by creating a proposal [6 hours]

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 4 in  English Language
  • Grade 4  in Media related subject such as IT or Art
BTEC Engineering

Title of Course
Engineering

Level
BTEC

Staff Contact
Raina Coules | Director of Learning for Design & Technology

Course Outline

Students will study four units to provide them with the practical skills and theoretical principles that are essential for a successful future career in the Engineering sector. 

All units are set around a vocational context and are delivered through hands on practical application. Students will have access to a fully equipped workshop with up-to-date technologies and advice from specialist technicians.

Students are required to provide clear and accurate evidence of their learning for all units and are encouraged to use their own learning styles to produce this evidence using a range of media.

Course Assessment

Internal

  • Unit 1: Engineering Principles, Written Exam Externally – Assessed
  • Unit 2: Delivery of Engineering Processes Safely as a Team – Internally Assessed

External

  • Unit 3: Engineering Product Design and Manufacture – Externally Assessed 8 Hour Controlled Assessment.
  • Unit 10: Computer Aided Design for Engineers

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 5 in Mathematics and Science
  • Merit or above in BTEC Level 2 Engineering
IB English Language and Literature

Title of Course
English Literature & Language

Level
IB

Staff Contact
Wesley HeerlallDirector of Learning for English

Course Outline

In English Language and Literature, students learn to: read deeply, explore and analyse a range of literary, non-literary, visual and written texts; use critical theory; and consider the impact of historical, cultural and other contextual factors on texts. In the Language part of the course, students study a range of non-literary texts, which include articles, advertisements, speeches, brochures, biographies, letters and other forms of writing. In the Literature part of the course, students study six literary texts, including two texts in translation and two graphic texts. Three of these lead to internal assessment: Slaughterhouse V, Embroideries and A Thousand Splendid Suns. The other three lead to external assessment: Othello, The World’s Wife and Hostage.

Course Assessment

External Assessment [60%]

  • Paper 1 (Language) – textual analysis of two unseen non-literary texts [2 hours]
  • Paper 2 (Literature) – one essay, using two of the literary texts studied [2 hours]

Internal Assessment [40%]

  • 1500 word essay, based upon one literary text (chosen by the student from a selection of 25 novels)
  • An oral presentation, comparing two extracts from a non-literary text and a literary text that both explore the same global issue

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 5+ in  English Literature and Language
A Level English Literature

Title of Course
English Literature

Level
A Level

Staff Contact
Wesley HeerlallDirector of Learning for English

Course Outline

In English Literature students read a variety of texts across time and learn to respond critically and analytically  to these texts. They consider how the texts produced are a product of their time and  how we might approach them as twenty-first century readers.  Students will learn how to explore a range of critical interpretations of the texts they study and they will be supported to develop the ability to write fluent, coherent and logical essays. The non-examined assessment offers students the opportunity to develop and explore their own interests in Literature and develop independent research skills

The texts studied include ‘Othello’, ‘The Great Gatsby’, ‘The HandMaid’s Tale’ and a wide range of poetry across time. 

Course Assessment

External Assessment (80%)

  • Paper 1: Love through the ages – students study three texts: one poetry and one prose text, of which one must be written pre-1900, and one Shakespeare play. The examination will include two unseen poems.
  • Paper 2 : Modern Times – students study three texts: one prose, one poetry, and one drama, of which one must be written post-2000. The examination will include an unseen prose extract.

Non-Examined Assessment (NEA) (20%)

  • 2500 word essay critically comparing two texts (chosen by the student).

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 6+ in English Language and Literature
IB Diploma Film

Title of Course
Film

Level
IB Diploma

Staff Contact
Adam Leadbeater | Coordinator of Learning – Media and Film

Course Outline

In IB Film students learn how to analyse the four key elements of filmmaking (Camerawork, Sound, Editing and Mise-en-scene) before creating a written and video essay. Students are given the opportunity to explore the planning processes within the film industry whilst creating a film reel and longer collaborative film as part of a production team. This is a well rounded, coursework based subject for those who wish to become filmmakers, with all the theoretical and practical skills they need.

Course Assessment

All coursework based

External Assessment

  • Assessment 1- Textual  Analysis 2000 word Textual analysis of a  visual/audio film text
  • Assessment 2 – Comparative Study Video essay production and editing task

Internal  Assessment

  • Assessment 3 – Film Portfolio Creating a film reel within three film roles
  • Assessment 4 – Collaborative Film Project Developing a 7 minute feature film as part of a production team

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 6 in  English Language
  • Grade 4  in Film-related subject such IT or History
LIBF Financial Studies (Certificate & Diploma)

Title of Course
Financial Studies

Level
LIBF Certificate and Diploma

Staff Contact
Adam Hart | Director of Learning – Business

Course Outline

Financial Studies at The Leigh Academy is covered by the London Institute of Banking and Finance DipFS. The course comprises the Certificate (CeFS) in Year 12 followed by the Diploma in Year 13. The DipFS prepares students for further study by developing their core skills of independent thinking, critical analysis and evaluation, verbal communication (through classroom discussion) and written communication. During the two years, students explore aspects of day-to-day finances and medium to long term personal financial planning, and then move onto areas such as sustainability in the wider financial services system, and the long-term effect of debt. The financially-related content of DipFS serves as a strong grounding for undergraduate study within finance and business-related disciplines, with many students going on to study accounting, business, finance and banking.

Course Assessment

External Assessment 100%

Unit 1 and Unit 2, Year 12

  • Part A: 45-minute exam – 35 multiple choice questions. 
  • Part B: 105 minute essay response exam based on pre-release case study.

Unit 3 and Unit 4, Year 13

  • Part A: 1-hour exam – 35 multiple choice questions.
  • Part B: 2 hour essay response exam based on pre-release case study.

Part B will also assess spelling, punctuation and grammar (SPAG) through the essay responses.

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade  4 in Mathematics
  • Grade 4 in English
A Level Fine Art

Title of Course
Fine Art

Level
A Level

Staff Contact
Christine Britton | Coordinator of Learning – Expressive Arts

Course Outline

This is a challenging course, where a range of both practical and research skills are taught to a high level. Students have the opportunity to use quality materials. We encourage students to explore media to gain confidence and control. There is an expectation that students will develop their own responses to given themes that is  supported by some in depth and independent research. To be successful, students need to develop their ideas through sustained focused investigations informed by contextual research and select media and process to develop their skill base through exploration and experimentation of technique and process.(ao1+2). First hand recording is important and we encourage lots of observational work to support and extend this (ao3). Each student will present a body of realised work, with links and connections to the works of others, (ao4).

There is a written component to the qualification that is separately assessed. Students will be required to write a critical essay about the work of other practitioners that demonstrates a high level of understanding of content, context, process and practice. Students will be assessed on their ability to investigate and develop ideas, make independent research exploring context and connections and develop personal responses recording their ideas and findings. 

The essay has a maximum of 3000 words. 

Course Assessment

This is a two year A level course with 4 key assessment areas all awarded equally.   Each assessment area is marked out of 18  with a total mark of 72.

There are 2 components of the qualification.

Component 1 consists of :

  • Practical coursework. In year 1 of the course this is directed and in Year 2 it is self directed with student developing their own pathway of learning .
  • Personal study.  Critical  essay  3000 words about artists/practitioners whose work relates to their own. This is given a separate mark of 18. 
  • The total mark for coursework is 90 and constitutes 60% of the final mark 

Component 2 consists of:

  • Planning and development, research and supporting material in response to a question set by the exam board
  • The students personal response (Exam timed piece) There is a 15 hour exam

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades including English
  • Grade 4 in Art or Graphics
A Level French

Title of Course
French

Level
A Level

Staff Contact
Thomas Hurth | Director of Learning – MFL

Course Outline

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop the skills and understanding of the French-speaking world acquired through GCSE study.

Topics studied at A level: aspects of French  speaking society;  current trends, such as the impact of the internet on society; artistic  culture in the French  speaking world, including work on French  cinema, music and literature, as well as political life in France. Each theme is dealt with in considerable depth. The course thus develops  problem-solving skills and the student’s ability to understand and  respond to complex issues and be able to talk and discuss these points confidently in the target language. Throughout the course, students will have access to 1:1 language development sessions with a Spanish language assistant, to help improve accent and spontaneity. 

Course Assessment

External Assessment (100%)

  • Paper 1: Listening, Reading and Writing – language based exam 150 minutes (50% of A-Level grade)
  • Paper 2: Writing exam (essays) on cultural topics studied (film / literature) 120 minutes (20% of A-Level grade)
  • Paper 3: Oral exam 23 minutes – including the 5 minutes preparation – consisting in a stimulus card and the Independent Research Project (30% of A-Level grade)

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 5 in  Mathematics
  • Minimum grade 5-5+ in Combined Science  or minimum  Grade 5 in Separate Science
IB Diploma Geography

Title of Course
Geography

Level
IB Diploma

Staff Contact
Christopher Bradley | Director of Learning – Humanities

Course Outline

Geography is a dynamic subject, firmly grounded in the real world, and focuses on the interactions between individuals, societies and physical processes in both time and space. It seeks to identify trends and patterns in these interactions. It also investigates the way in which people adapt and respond to change, and evaluates actual and possible management strategies associated with such change. Geography describes and helps to explain the similarities and differences between different places, on a variety of scales and from different perspectives. 

Geography as a subject is distinctive in its spatial dimension and occupies a middle ground between social or human sciences and natural sciences. The course integrates physical, environmental and human geography, and students acquire elements of both socio-economic and scientific methodologies. Geography takes advantage of its position to examine relevant concepts and ideas from a wide variety of disciplines, helping students develop life skills and have an appreciation of, and a respect for, alternative approaches, viewpoints and ideas.

Course Assessment

External assessment – 80%

  • 3 examinations with a range of short and long answer questions as well as responding to stimulus like maps and graphs.

Internal assessment – 20%

  • Fieldwork

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 5 in English Language or Literature
  • Grade 6+ in Geography
IB Diploma Global Politics

Title of Course
Global Politics

Level
IB Diploma

Staff Contact
Christopher Bradley | Director of Learning – Humanities

Course Outline

Global Politics explores fundamental political concepts, such as power, equality, sustainability and peace, in a range of contexts. It allows students to develop an understanding of the local, national, international and global dimensions of political activity and processes, as well as opportunities to explore political issues affecting their own lives. The course helps students to understand abstract political concepts by grounding them in real-world examples and case studies. It also invites comparison between such examples and case studies to ensure a wider and transnational perspective.

The aims of the global politics course are to enable students to: 

  • understand key political concepts and contemporary political issues in a range of contexts 
  • develop an understanding of the local, national, international and global dimensions of political activity 
  • understand, appreciate and critically engage with a variety of perspectives and approaches in global politics 
  • appreciate the complex and interconnected nature of many political issues, and develop the capacity to interpret competing and contestable claims regarding those issues.

Course Assessment

External assessment – 60%

  • Two examination papers including sources to analyse and long answer essays.

Internal assessment – 40%

  • An ‘engagement activity’ involving a written report about a chosen political issue, as well as producing 2 separate video presentations on chosen topics of interest in Global Politics.

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Preferably Grade 6 in a Humanities related subject and Grade 5 in English
A Level Graphic Communication

Title of Course
Graphic Communication

Level
A Level

Staff Contact
Christine Britton | Coordinator of Learning – Expressive Arts

Course Outline

This is a challenging course where a range of both practical and research skills are taught to a high level. Students have the opportunity to work in a range of Graphic Design approaches from Illustration to Branding.  The critical element for a Graphic designer is the effective communication of a message or idea through the organisation of images and words.Students will develop handcrafted and digital skills and work to a range of briefs supported by some in depth and independent research. To be successful students need to develop their ideas through sustained focused investigations informed by contextual research and select media and process to develop their skill base through exploration and experimentation of technique and process, (ao1+2). Recording is an important element of the course (ao3. Each student will present a body of realised work with links and connections to the works of others, (ao4).

There is a written component to the qualification that is separately assessed. Students will be required to write a critical essay about the work of other practitioners that demonstrates a high level of understanding of content, context, process and practice. Students will be assessed on their ability to investigate and develop ideas, make independent research exploring context and connections and develop personal responses recording their ideas and findings. The essay has a maximum of 3000 words.

Course Assessment

This is a two year A level course with 4 key assessment areas all awarded equally.   Each assessment area is marked out of 18  with a total mark of 72.

There are 2 components of the qualification.

Component 1 consists of :

  • Practical coursework.  In year 1 of the course this is directed and in Year 2 it is self directed with student developing their own pathway of learning .
  • Personal study.  Critical  essay  3000 words about artists/practitioners whose work relates to their own. This is given a separate mark of 18.  

The total mark for coursework is 90 and constitutes 60% of the final mark 

Component 2 consists of:

  • Planning and development, research and supporting material in response to a question set by the exam board
  • The students personal response (Exam timed piece). There is a 15 hour exam.

These two elements are a given a total mark of 72 and constitute 40% of the final mark

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 4 in English
  • Grade 4 in Art or Graphics
BTEC Health & Social Care

Title of Course
Health and Social Care

Level
BTEC

Staff Contact
Christopher Bradley | Director of Learning – Humanities

Course Outline

Young people taking their first steps towards a new career need the right blend of technical and academic skills in order to become the highly skilled, work-ready individuals employers and universities look for. BTEC Level 3 Nationals are vocational qualifications are designed to help you  succeed. This course has been developed in partnership with universities and employers.  

The Extended Certificate in Health and Social Care is equivalent to an A-level. Students are taught four separate units, evenly distributed across the two years. In Year 12 students complete coursework about different  Healthcare professionals and how people are cared for in the community in an array of different setting and to a variety of case study examples of people with different needs. By Year 13, students are ready to study the final two topics on human lifespan development and how to care for people with learning difficulties of different ages.

Course Assessment

Students will complete one examination and one piece of coursework in each year of the course. The two pieces of  coursework make up 50% of the grade, while the two examinations make up the final 50%. 

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 4 in English Language or Literature,
  • Grade 4 in Mathematics
  • Grade 4 in a Science related subject
A Level History

Title of Course
History

Level
A Level

Staff Contact
Jean Wood | Coordinator  of Learning – History

Course Outline

History is a challenging subject which requires students to use evidence, to research, organise and articulate their findings in a coherent written form. History challenges students to form their own conclusions from the available evidence.  History encourages independent learning and students will benefit from the development of their research skills and the study of both depth and breadth of the content.  Students are encouraged to think critically and analytically.

The topics studied during the course are:

  • Britain Transformed 1918-1974
  • The USA c1920-55: boom, bust  and recovery
  • The witch craze in Britain, Europe and North America c 1580-c1750

Course Assessment

External Assessment (80%) 

  • Paper 1 – Breadth Study with Historical Interpretations 30%
  • Paper 2 – Depth Study 20%
  • Paper 3 – Themes in breadth and aspects in depth 30%

Internal Assessment (20%)

  •  Coursework essay on USA Great Depression and the New Deal (Historical interpretations 20%)

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 5 in English Language or Literature
  • Grade 6 in History
BTEC Information Technology (IT)

Title of Course
Information Technology (IT)

Level
BTEC

Staff Contact
Manjinder Hayre | Coordinator of Learning – ICT

Course Outline

In BTEC Information Technology, students have the opportunity to develop their knowledge and skills in IT. Candidates study the relationship between hardware and software, managing and communicating information and data, and the principles of designing and developing digital technologies and processes to support organisations. Students will examine the structure of data and its origins, and how an efficient data design follows through to an effective and useful database. Students will examine a given scenario and develop an effective design solution to produce a database system.

Candidates will explore different social media websites, the ways in which they can be used and the potential pitfalls when using them for business purposes. Students will develop a plan to use social media strategies for business purposes to achieve specific aims and objectives. Students will review existing websites – commenting on their overall design and effectiveness. They will use scripting languages such as Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), JavaScript® and a simple text editor, or rapid application development tools. 

This course will allow progression to a variety of degrees when combined with other suitable Level 3 qualifications.

Course Assessment

External Assessment (50%)

  • Unit 1: Information Technology Systems
  • Unit 2: Creating Systems to Manage Information 

Internal Assessment (50%)

  • Unit 3: Using Social Media in Business 
  • Unit 6: Website Development

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 4 in English Language or Literature,
  • Grade 4 in Mathematics 
  • Grade 4 in IT
A Level Mathematics

Title of Course
Mathematics

Level
A Level

Staff Contact
Dina Grozdanic | Director  of Learning – Mathematics

Course Outline

This course is intellectually demanding and only students who have proven ability at GCSE level are likely to make transition to A-level study successfully. The majority of students who apply to study A-level Mathematics are expected to continue onto higher education degree course. A-level Mathematics is an essential requirement for all Engineering, Accountancy and many Science and Business degree courses, as well as IT courses and Economics.  

Mathematics at this level consists of the study of Pure Mathematics and the study of application of Mathematics to the physical world with Mechanics and Statistics concepts. All students enrolled into this course study AS level in Year 12 and, if they do not meet progression requirements at the end of Year 12, they will continue to study Mathematics on the AS level throughout the Year 13. Those who understand the concepts in Year 12, will continue further, studying more challenging topics for the A level of this course.

Course Assessment

A level  assessment consists of:

  • Paper 1: Pure Mathematics 1 (9MAO/01) – 33.33% of the overall grade (100 marks)
  • Paper 2: Pure Mathematics 2 (9MAO/02) – 33.33% of the overall grade (100 marks)
  • Paper 3: Statistics and Mechanics (9MAO/03) – 33.33% of the overall grade (100 marks)

AS  level assessment consists of:

  • Paper 1: Pure Mathematics (8MAO/01) – 62.5% of the qualification, 100 marks, 2 hours
  • Paper 2: Statistics and Mechanics (8MAO/02)- 37.5% of the qualification, (1 hour and 15 minutes, 60 marks)

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 7 in Mathematics
IB Diploma Mathematics: Applications and Interpretations (Standard Level)

Title of Course
Mathematics: Applications and Interpretations

Level
IB Diploma (Standard Level)

Staff Contact
Dina Grozdanic | Director  of Learning – Mathematics

Course Outline

Mathematics applications and Interpretation has an emphasis on applications of mathematics and statistical techniques. It is designed for students with varied mathematical backgrounds and abilities. It prepares students to be able to solve problems in a variety of settings, to develop more sophisticated mathematical reasoning and to enhance their critical thinking.

  • Topic 1: Algebra
  • Topic 2: Functions
  • Topic 3: Geometry & Trigonometry
  • Topic 4: Statistics & Probability
  • Topic 5: Calculus 
  • Project – The project is an individual piece of work involving the collection of information or the generation of measurements, and the analysis and evaluation of the information or measurements.

Course Assessment

This qualification is made up of 80% external assessment split between two equal weighted exam papers (both require a graphical calculator) and 20% internally assessed project.

Please note that this is a Standard Level Course, worth the equivalent of half an A Level.

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 5, preferably 6 in Mathematics
BTEC Performing Arts Acting

Title of Course
Performing Arts

Level
BTEC

Staff Contact
Helen WilsonCoordinator of Learning – Drama

Course Outline

In Performing Arts, students investigate the working life of an actor and what is needed to be successful in the world of acting. A range of practitioners’ techniques and  plays are explored, from naturalism to extreme physical theatre and everything in between. Students will explore the contextual factors around each practitioner and their repertoire of work. In addition, there is a written paper with three parts to it. Students have four weeks to prepare around their favourite practitioners and are permitted to take four sides of notes in.  The last part of the course is a devised group piece where students are given a stimulus by the exam board and then research and build an unique piece of theatre from there, applying all previous skills and techniques used.

Course Assessment

External Assessment (60%) 

  • Unit 1: Investigating Practitioners – 3 hour written exam in 3 parts with 4 weeks to prepare. Notes permitted. 
  • Unit 3: Group Performance – Devise a piece from a given stimulus, supported by 4 800 word digital submissions. 

Internal Assessment (40%)

  • Unit 2: Developing Skills and Techniques For A Live Audience – Various workshops, 2 performances, one presentation.   
  • Unit 19: Acting Styles   –  1 performance and analysis of 3 practitioners’ techniques.

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 5 in  Mathematics
  • Minimum grade 5-5+ in Combined Science  or minimum  Grade 5 in Separate Science
A Level Photography

Title of Course
Applied Science

Level
BTEC

Staff Contact
Christine Britton | Coordinator of Learning – Expressive Arts

Course Outline

Designed for learners who are interested in learning about the sector alongside other fields of study, with a view to progressing to a wide range of higher education courses, not necessarily in applied science. Anyone considering a career in nursing should take this course, along with BTEC Health and Social Care.  The course comprises 3 core mandatory units and one option unit:

  •  Unit 1: Principles and Applications of Science
  •  Unit 2: Practical Scientific Procedures and Techniques
  •  Unit 3: Science Investigation Skills

The fourth unit, covering content from one of a range of optional units, is also taught and assessed.

Course Assessment

Externally assessed Units:

  • Unit 1: Assessed via 3x 40 minutes external written examinations – one examination per science. Each examination is out of 30 marks.
  • Unit 3: Assessed across two sections, Unit 3 involves the completion of a practical investigation (3 hours) followed by written exam questions (1.5 hours) relating to the procedure, analysis and evaluation of the investigation.

Internally assessed Units:

  • Unit 2 & The Option Unit: Students complete a portfolio of assignments, linking key practical procedures to their underlying scientific concepts.

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 5 in  Mathematics
  • Minimum grade 5-5+ in Combined Science  or minimum  Grade 5 in Separate Science
A Level Product Design

Title of Course
Product Design

Level
A Level

Staff Contact
Raina Coules | Director of Learning for Design & Technology

Course Outline

Product Design is a creative and stimulating subject that encourages students to develop a broad view of design and technology. It enables the ability to design and make products whilst appreciating the complex relationships between design, materials, manufacture, the history of design and the evolution of technology. Students will need to be creative, inquisitive risk-takers, who are able to work independently to achieve best results. They will work closely alongside clients to meet self-generated or given briefs and will develop their communication, analytical and problem solving skills.

Students will cover a wide range of units and by the end of the course will be able to determine, classify and analyse a comprehensive range of materials and components; understand and analyse the necessity of designing for our surroundings, considering the environment and inclusiveness; consumer safety and technological developments and be familiar and confident with an array of manufacturing processes and fabrication methods at different scales of production.

Course Assessment

Each year you will be examined by a final written  examination; a design portfolio, supported by a design thinking sketchbook and a practical product.

Year 1

  • DT 1: Examination, 2 hour paper
  • DT 2: Design and Make Task

Year 2

  • DT 3: Examination, 2.5 hour paper
  • DT 4: Major Project

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 5 in  Mathematics
  • Minimum grade 5-5+ in Combined Science  or minimum  Grade 5 in Separate Science
IB Diploma Physics

Title of Course
Physics

Level
IB Diploma

Staff Contact
Craig Goddard | Director of Learning – Science

Course Outline

Physics is the most fundamental of the experimental sciences, as it seeks to explain the universe itself from the very smallest particles – currently accepted as quarks, which may be truly fundamental – to the vast distances between galaxies. Despite the exciting and extraordinary development of ideas throughout the history of physics, certain aspects have remained unchanged. Observations remain essential to the very core of physics, sometimes requiring a leap of imagination to decide what to look for. Models are developed to try to understand observations, and these themselves can become theories that attempt to explain the observations.

The Post-16 IB Physics course explores the following topic areas:

Core

  • Measurements and uncertainties
  • Mechanics
  • Thermal physics
  • Waves
  • Electricity and magnetism
  • Circular motion and gravitation
  • Atomic, nuclear and particle physics
  • Energy production

Additional Higher Level

  • Wave phenomena
  • Fields
  • Electromagnetic induction
  • Quantum and nuclear physics

Course Assessment

 External Assessment (80%)

  • Paper 1: Multiple Choice Questions
  • Paper 2: Written responses for SL & HL core
  • Paper 3: Written responses for option unit and practical skills

Internal Assessment (20%)

  • A written report on the findings of an experiment conducted by students.

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 6 in  Mathematics
  • Grade 6-6+ in Combined Science or 6+ in Physics
IB Diploma Psychology

Title of Course
Psychology

Level
IB Diploma

Staff Contact
Christopher Bradley | Director of Learning – Humanities

Course Outline

At the core of the Psychology course is an introduction to three different approaches to understanding behaviour: the biological, cognitive and sociocultural approaches. Students study and critically evaluate the knowledge, concepts, theories and research that have developed the understanding in these fields. 

The interaction of these approaches to studying Psychology forms the basis of a holistic and integrated approach to understanding mental processes and behaviour as a complex, dynamic phenomenon, allowing students to appreciate the diversity as well as the commonality between their own behaviour and that of others. 

The contribution and the interaction of the three approaches is understood through the four options in the course that focus on areas of applied psychology: abnormal psychology, developmental psychology, health psychology, and the psychology of relationships. 

Course Assessment

External Assessment (80%)

  • 3 Examination papers, with a mixture of short and long answer questions. 

Internal Assessment (20%)

  • A written report on the findings of an experiment conducted by students

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 5 in English Language or Literature
  • Grade 6 in Biology or 6-6+ in Combine Science
IB Diploma Social and Cultural Anthropology

Title of Course
Social and Cultural Anthropology

Level
IB Diploma

Staff Contact
Christopher Bradley | Director of Learning – Humanities

Course Outline

In studying this course, students will come to appreciate how Anthropology as a discipline contributes to an understanding of contemporary issues, such as war and conflict, the environment, poverty, injustice, inequality and human and cultural rights. The study of Social and Cultural Anthropology offers critical insight into the continuities as well as dynamics of social change and the development of societies, and challenges cultural assumptions.

Students undertaking this course will have the opportunity to become acquainted with anthropological perspectives and ways of thinking, and to develop critical, reflexive knowledge. Social and Cultural Anthropology contributes to a distinctive approach to intercultural awareness and understanding. It allows students to develop the capacity to recognize preconceptions and assumptions of their own social and cultural environments, through an exploration of both the familiar and unfamiliar worlds of other people.

Course Assessment

External Assessment (75%)

  • Paper 1 : Engaging with Anthropology
  • Paper 2 : Engaging with Ethnography

Internal Assessment (25%)

  • Field work, including a observation, write up and reflection. 

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 5 in English Language or Literature
A Level Spanish

Title of Course
Spanish

Level
A Level

Staff Contact
Thomas Hurth | Director of Learning – MFL

Course Outline

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop the skills and understanding of the Hispanic-speaking world acquired through GCSE study.

Topics studied at A level: aspects of Spanish  speaking society;  current trends, such as the impact of the internet on society; artistic  culture in the Spanish speaking world, including work on Spanish  cinema, music and literature, as well as political life in Spain. Each theme is dealt with in considerable depth. The course thus develops  problem-solving skills and the student’s ability to understand and  respond to complex issues and be able to talk and discuss these points confidently in the target language. Throughout the course, students will have access to 1:1 language development sessions with a Spanish language assistant, to help improve accent and spontaneity.

Course Assessment

Externally assessed Units (100%):

  • Paper 1: Listening, Reading and Writing – language based exam 150 minutes (50% of A-Level grade)
  • Paper 2: Writing exam (essays) on cultural topics studied (film / literature) 120 minutes (20% of A-Level grade) 
  • Paper 3: Oral exam 23 minutes – including the 5 minutes preparation – consisting in a stimulus card and the Independent Research Project (30% of A-Level grade)

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades including English
  • Grade 6 in Spanish
BTEC Sport

Title of Course
Sport

Level
BTEC

Staff Contact
Kirsty Marshall | Teacher of Physical Education & Sport BTEC Lead

Course Outline

In Sport, students will learn how to work independently and gain the ability to research actively and methodically. These are transferable skills that further education providers value. This subject will cover aspects on Applied Anatomy and Physiology, Fitness Training and Programming for Health, Sport and Well-being, Professional Development in the Sports Industry and Sports Leadership and be assessed through both external examinations and internal assessments . This subject will provide students with a broad knowledge of Sport for further education or employment within the sporting industry.

Course Assessment

External Assessment (67%)

  • Unit 1 Anatomy & Physiology – (1 hour 30 mins)
  • Unit 2 Fitness training and programming for health sport and well-being – (2 hours 30 mins)

Internal Assessment (33%)

  • Unit 3 – Professional development in the sports industry:
    Students will explore the knowledge and skills required for different career pathways in the sports industry. Students will take part in, and reflect on, a personal skills audit, career action plan and practical interview assessment activities.
  • Unit 4 – Sports Leadership – Students will complete assignments based on:
    Leadership roles and understanding the impact of their skills, qualities and characteristics
    How psychological factors affect sporting performance and sports leaders

Students will also learn what fundamentals are necessary when delivering their own coaching session. They will plan and deliver a session and then complete a review on their understanding of different leadership strategies and create their own action plan to improve their own practice for the future.

Entry Requirements

  • 5+ GCSE 9-4 grades
  • Grade 5 in  Mathematics
  • Minimum grade 5-5+ in Combined Science  or minimum  Grade 5 in Separate Science